Sunday, November 3, 2013

British Society for Literature and Science Conference 2014: Call for Papers

British Society for Literature and Science Conference 2014: Call for Papers

The ninth annual conference of the British Society for Literature and Science will take place at the University of Surrey, Guildford, on 10-12 April 2014. Keynote talks will be given by Professor Jim Al-Khalili (University of Surrey), Professor Bernard Lightman (York University, Toronto), and Professor Mary Orr (University of Southampton). The conference will finish with an opportunity to visit Down House, the home of Charles Darwin, on the afternoon of Saturday 12 April.

The BSLS invites proposals for twenty-minute papers, or panels of three papers, on any subjects within the field of literature and science. This year the organisers would particularly welcome proposals addressing links between science and European and world literatures, and proposals for papers or panels on teaching literature and science. However, the BSLS remains committed to supporting and showcasing work on all aspects of literature and science.

Proposals of no more than 250 words, together with the name and institutional affiliation of the speaker, should be sent in the body of messages (not in attachments) to g.tate@surrey.ac.uk. Proposals for panels should include a separate proposal for each paper. The closing date for submissions is Friday 6 December 2013.

The conference fee will be waived for two graduate students in exchange for written reports on the conference, to be published in the BSLS Newsletter. If you are interested in being selected for one of these awards, please mention this when sending in your proposal. To qualify you will need to be registered for a postgraduate degree at the time of the conference.

Accommodation: please note that those attending the conference will need to make their own arrangements for accommodation. Information on local hotels is available on the conference website.

Membership: conference delegates will need to register as members of the BSLS (annual membership: £25 waged / £10 unwaged). It will be possible to join the BSLS when registering for the conference online.


For further information and updates about the conference, please contact Gregory Tate (g.tate@surrey.ac.uk) or visit the conference website at http://tinyurl.com/pp6ubz5.

Friday, October 4, 2013


The Susan Morgan Graduate Student Essay Prize 
Guidelines for the Inaugural 2014 Award
Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) is pleased to announce the inauguration of the Susan Morgan Graduate Student Essay Prize. The prize has been established in honor of Susan Morgan, Distinguished Professor of English at Miami University, a prolific, interdisciplinary scholar of nineteenth-century literature and culture, and a longstanding member of INCS. Professor Morgan’s scholarship has shaped the interdisciplinary fields of women’s writing, travel writing, and empire studies—fields that are central to the work of many INCS scholars—and she has generously mentored countless graduate students and junior colleagues. Her selected publications include In the Meantime: Character and Perception in Jane Austen’s Fiction (Chicago, 1980); Sisters in Time: Imagining Gender in Nineteenth- Century British Fiction (Oxford, 1989); Place Matters: Gendered Geography in Victorian Women’s Travel Writings about Southeast Asia (Rutgers, 1996); and Bombay Anna: The Real Story and Remarkable Adventures of the King and I Governess (California, 2008). We are fortunate to have Professor Morgan as a valued member of INCS.

Guidelines
1) The Susan Morgan Graduate Student Essay Prize will be awarded annually, at the annual conference each year. The inaugural 2014 prize will be awarded in Houston, Texas.
2) Eligible essays must be posted to the INCS conference website by the submission due date and presented for discussion by the author at the conference. Submissions may not exceed the length specified for INCS papers on the conference website; for 2014, the length is 4,000 words.
3) The prize will be announced at each annual conference.
4) The award is $500 and publication of the essay in Nineteenth-Century Contexts, the INCS-affiliated peer- reviewed journal. The winning author will work with readers for the journal and be given the opportunity to revise the essay prior to publication.
5) The second-place essay will be awarded the designation “Honorable Mention.”
6) The due date is the date designated for papers to be submitted prior to the INCS annual conference. For the inaugural 2014 essay prize, that date is March 1, 2014. Papers submitted after that date cannot be considered for the prize.
6) Papers should be uploaded to the conference website in doc format, per website instructions. Please include this phrase at the top of submission papers: SUBMISSION FOR THE SUSAN MORGAN GRADUATE STUDENT ESSAY PRIZE (which will be removed before the paper is posted to its assigned conference panel).
7) The competition will be judged by a panel of judges appointed by the INCS board.
8) No judge will be allowed to assess his or her own submission or to assess work submitted by anyone with whom the judge has worked closely.
9) INCS reserves the right to award no prize in any given year. 

Tuesday, September 24, 2013


British Society for Literature and Science Conference 2014: Call for Papers

The ninth annual conference of the British Society for Literature and Science will take place at the University of Surrey, Guildford, on 10-12 April 2014. Keynote speakers will include Professor Bernard Lightman (York University, Toronto) and Professor Mary Orr (University of Southampton). The conference will finish with an opportunity to visit Down House, the home of Charles Darwin, on the afternoon of Saturday 12 April.

The BSLS invites proposals for twenty-minute papers, or panels of three papers, on any subjects within the field of literature and science. This year the organisers would particularly welcome proposals addressing links between science and European and world literatures, and proposals for papers or panels on teaching literature and science. However, the BSLS remains committed to supporting and showcasing work on all aspects of literature and science.

Proposals of no more than 250 words, together with the name and institutional affiliation of the speaker, should be sent in the body of messages (not in attachments) to g.tate@surrey.ac.uk. Proposals for panels should include a separate proposal for each paper. The closing date for submissions is Friday 6 December 2013.

The conference fee will be waived for two graduate students in exchange for written reports on the conference, to be published in the BSLS Newsletter. If you are interested in being selected for one of these awards, please mention this when sending in your proposal. To qualify you will need to be registered for a postgraduate degree at the time of the conference.

Accommodation: please note that those attending the conference will need to make their own arrangements for accommodation. Information on local hotels will shortly be made available on the conference website.

Membership: conference delegates will need to register as members of the BSLS (annual membership: £25 waged / £10 unwaged). It will be possible to join the BSLS when registering for the conference online.

For further information and updates about the conference, please contact Gregory Tate (g.tate@surrey.ac.uk) or visit the conference website at http://tinyurl.com/pp6ubz5.

Tuesday, August 6, 2013


Beyond the Grand Tour: Continental Tourism and Travel Writing, 1815-1915

With the re-opening of borders on the Continent in 1814/15, writers flooded the literary market with works exploring continental tours and experiences. We invite submissions for a proposed essay collection concerning the trends and evolutions of travel writing about and within the Continent during the long nineteenth century. Essays might address gendered travel, narratives determinedly off the beaten paths, Byronic or other ‘celebrity’ tourism, commercialization and mass tourism, genre challenges and boundaries, and the intersections of tourism and travel in many different avenues. Essays will consider the variety of ways in which writers responded to the opening of borders and their accompanying crossings throughout the century, as well as the ways in which familiarity with such Continental landscapes mutated with the development of texts and culture at home and abroad. Authors are invited to submit their essays of approximately 6,500 words, by January 1st, 2014, via email to Dr. Benjamin Colbert (B.Colbert@wlv.ac.uk) and Dr. Lucy Morrison (lxmorrison@salisbury.edu); Palgrave has already expressed an interest in considering the collection. All enquiries are welcome.

Making Waves: Oliver Lodge and the Cultures of Science, 1875-1940

Call for Papers: Workshop 1: Civic Science: Oliver Lodge, Physics, and
the Modern University, University of Birmingham, Saturday 9 November
2013

The physicist Oliver Lodge spent most of his scientific career at the
newly founded University College Liverpool before joining the
University of Birmingham as its first Principal in 1900, retiring in
1919.  This workshop, the first in a series of four organized by James
Mussell and Graeme Gooday’s AHRC Research Network ‘Making Waves,
Oliver Lodge and the Culture of Science, 1875-1940’, will investigate
both the place of science within the university and the place of the
university in the city.  Hosted by the Centre for the Study of
Cultural Modernity at the University of Birmingham, we invite papers
that consider Lodge’s legacy for the University and Birmingham, as
well as those that consider the place of science in the civic
university at the end of the nineteenth century and the first decades
of the twentieth.

Proposals are invited for papers of 40 minutes that explore any of the
following themes:

* Oliver Lodge’s career at the University of Birmingham
* The creation of the civic university
* The place of science in the civic university
* The relationship between pure and applied science within the university
* Oliver Lodge’s influence on the city of Birmingham
* University science education in the late 19th / early 20th century
* The creation of the University of Birmingham at Edgbaston
* Oliver Lodge’s complementary careers within and beyond the university
* Science communication and popular science in the late 19th / early
20th century
* Oliver Lodge’s wife and family and their respective lives, careers,
and legacies

Please send proposals (500 words) to <oliverlodgenetwork@gmail.com> by
13 September 2013

This project is funded by an AHRC Research Networking Grant.  Further
details, including forthcoming symposia about Lodge, can be found
here: <http://www.oliverlodge.org>.  Follow us on Twitter
@oliverjlodge.

You can download the call for papers here:
<http://oliverlodge.org/oliverlodge_civic_science_cfp>

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

NCSA Article Prize and Emerging Scholars Award

Article Prize
The Nineteenth Century Studies Association (NCSA) is pleased to announce the 2014 Article Prize, which recognizes excellence in scholarly studies from any discipline focusing on any aspect of the long 19th century (French Revolution to World War I). The winner will receive a cash award of $500 to be presented at the Thirty-fifth Annual NCSA Conference, “Urbanism and Urbanity” in Chicago, Illinois (March 20-22, 2014).

Articles published between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2013 are eligible for consideration for the 2014 prize and may be submitted by the author or the publisher of a journal, anthology, or volume containing independent essays. The submission of essays that take an interdisciplinary approach is especially encouraged. The winning article will be selected by a committee of nineteenth-century scholars representing diverse disciplines. Applicants are encouraged to attend the conference at which the prize will be awarded.

Send one PDF file electronically of published articles/essays, including the publication’s name/volume/date etc. to the chair of the committee at the following email address: guernsey@fiu.edu. All submissions via email will be acknowledged; queries should be addresses to Professor Daniel Guernsey at the same email address. Applicants must verify date of actual publication for eligibility, and one entry per scholar or publisher is allowed annually. Essays written in part or entirely in a language other than English must be accompanied by English translations. Deadline for submission is September 30, 2013.


Emerging Scholars Award
The Nineteenth Century Studies Association (NCSA) is pleased to announce the 2013 Emerging Scholars Award. The work of emerging scholars represents the promise and long-term future of interdisciplinary scholarship in 19th-century studies. In recognition of the excellent publications of this constituency of emerging scholars, this award recognizes an outstanding article or essay published within five years of the author's doctorate. Entries can be from any discipline focusing on any aspect of the long 19th century (the French Revolution to World War I), must be published in English or be accompanied by an English translation, and must be by a single author. Submission of essays that are interdisciplinary is especially encouraged.

Entrants must be within five years of having received a doctorate or other terminal professional degree, and must have less than seven years of experience either in an academic career, or as a post-terminal-degree independent scholar or practicing professional.

Only articles physically published between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2013 (even if the citation date of the journal is different) are eligible for the 2013 Emerging Scholar Award. Articles published in any scholarly journal, including on-line journals, or in edited volumes of essays are eligible and may be submitted either by the author or the publisher of a journal, anthology, or volume containing independent  essays. In any given year, an applicant may submit more than one article for this award.

The winning article will be selected by a committee of nineteenth-century scholars representing diverse disciplines. Articles submitted to the NCSA Article Prize competition are ineligible for the Emerging Scholars Award. The winner will receive $500 to be presented at the annual NCSA Conference in Chicago, IL, March 20-22, 2014. Prize recipients need not be members of the NCSA but are encouraged to attend the conference to receive the award.

Deadline for submission is September 30, 2013.

Send a PDF of published articles/essays to the committee chair, Professor Elif Armbruster, at earmbruster@suffolk.edu. Address all questions to Dr. Armbruster at the same email address. Please note that applicants must verify date of actual publication for eligibility.

NCSA 2014 Conference: Urbanism and Urbanity

CFP: Urbanism and Urbanity
March 20-22, Chicago IL
deadline: September 30, 2013
to: Maria K. Bachman and Maria Gindhart, Program Co-Chairs, ncsa2014@gmail.com
http://www.ncsaweb.net/

We seek papers and panels that investigate elements of urbanism and urbanity during' the long nineteenth century, such
as: urbanites (the flaneur, the prostitute,the detective, the criminal, etc.); urbanites and the rise of consumer culture;
immigrants and urban communities: urban domesticity in literature and culture; architecture, urban design, and city
planning; urban spaces and the gothic imagination; mobilities and forms of urban transport; the politics of urban space;
the city and the natural environment; urban cartographies; urban crime and violence; urban spaces and urban peripheries
(suburbs; ghettos, wastelands, industrial zones, dumps and other hybrid spaces); urbanism and public health; animals
and urban environments; concert halls, opera houses, and other urban entertainment venues; restaurants, cafes, and
urban eating and drinking; leisure and urbanism; city/country divides; and the anti-urban tradition in art and literature.

We welcome other interpretations of the conference theme as well. Please e-mail abstracts (250 words) for 20-minute
papers that include the author's name, institutional affiliation, and paper title in the heading, as well as a one-page CV, by
September 30, 2013 to: Maria K. Bachman and Maria Gindhart, Program Co-Chairs,ncsa2014@gmail.com
Please note that submission of a proposal constitutes a commitment to attend the conference if the proposal is accepted.
All proposals received will be acknowledged, and presenters will be notified in November 2013. Graduate students
whose proposals are accepted may, at that point, submit complete papers in competition for a travel grant to help cover
transportation and lodging expenses. Scholars who live outside the North American continent, whose proposals have
been accepted, may submit a full paper to be considered for the International Scholar Travel Grant. (See the NCSA
website for additional requirements -- http://www.ncsaweb.net/)
Proposal Deadline: September 30,2013

Saturday, April 13, 2013


Journal of Popular Romance Studies
CALL FOR PAPERS

Romancing the Long British 19th Century

The long British nineteenth century (1789-1914) appears to have the long global twentieth century (including the first decades of the twenty-first) in its thrall. Regency and Victorian settings proliferate in popular romance fiction, ranging from scenes of domestic life within the United Kingdom to British espionage in Europe and British colonial settlements. Retellings and “sequels” of Jane Austen’s novels line our (digital) bookshelves and fill fan-fiction websites, spilling over most recently into the YouTube sensation The Lizzie Bennet Diaries. Such adaptations of Austen’s novels, along with film and TV versions of the Brontë sisters’ Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights, and Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South, suggest that modern audiences cannot get enough of stories about Georgians, Victorians, and Edwardians in love.
The Journal of Popular Romance Studies seeks papers on this enduring love affair with 19th-century Britain. Why does a period that is historically associated with the establishment of the Industrial Revolution, the consolidation of the Empire, and the coalescing of middle-class mores now strike us as a particularly “romantic” era? How do popular and middlebrow media from around the world construct, interpret, and recast the world of 19th c. Britain, broadly construed? What do these interpretations say about our current moment and our modern (or postmodern) thoughts and feelings about romance?
We welcome submissions that explore these and related questions from any disciplinary or theoretical angle. We invite papers that cover different media, including (paper and digital) literature, film, TV, online content, and marketing.
This Special Issue of The Journal of Popular Romance Studies is guest edited by Jayashree Kamble and Pamela Regis. Please submit scholarly papers of no more than 10,000 words, including notes and bibliography, by March 1 2014, to An Goris, Managing Editor, at  managing.editor@jprstudies.org.  Submissions should be Microsoft Word documents, with citations in MLA format. For more information on how to submit a paper, please visit http://jprstudies.org/submissions/

http://www.realuniguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/st_andrews.jpeg                     in:flux
1845-1945: A Century in Motion

University of Birmingham, 27th June 2013
Keynote speaker – Dr Matthew Rubery, Queen Mary University of London
Interdisciplinary postgraduate conference – call for papers
How did the rapid period of industrialisation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries help to shape societies and lifestyles in the West? What types of social changes, movements and developments characterise this time period? This interdisciplinary postgraduate conference, in affiliation with the Centre for the Study of Cultural Modernity and hosted by the College of Arts and Law, seeks to explore the various ways in which this century was one of ‘motion’, in every sense of the word. The conference title seeks to encapsulate both the uncertainty and upheaval of this period as well as the physical and cultural movements that occurred at this time. We invite papers addressing these themes from postgraduate researchers and early-career academics working on this period from a variety of backgrounds.
Topics could include, but are not limited to:
Cultural or social movements
·       political movements
·       the Women’s Movement
·       arts movements (musical, artistic, literary)
·       religious and philosophical
·       popular cultural trends (food, fashion, advertising)
Physical movements
·       mass movement of people (mobilisation of soldiers, migration from towns to cities)
·       transatlantic and inter-continental travel (including emigration and immigration)
·       leisure and tourism
·       transport
·       changing landscapes
Development and progress
·       media (cinema, audio technology and radio, print media)
·       scientific and medical advances
·       technology
·       economic growth and/or recession
·       development of nationhood

These headings are suggestions only; we welcome proposals exploring crossovers between these topics, or addressing them from interdisciplinary perspectives. Abstracts of 250-300 words for 20 minute papers along with a short biographical note of no more than 50 words should be sent to pgculturalmodernity@contacts.bham.ac.uk by the 17th May 2013. We welcome any questions that you may have; please do not hesitate to contact us at the above address.
For more information about the Centre for the Study of Cultural Modernity please visit their website:

Monday, February 4, 2013


INTERNATIONAL BYRON CONFERENCE 2013

Registration and Call for Papers NOW OPEN

The Byron Society and King’s College London are pleased to announce that the website for the 39th International Byron Conference, 1-6 July 2013, is now open.

See  http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/chs/events/Byron-Conference/index.aspx for details of registration, booking of accommodation and options, and the call for papers.

Early booking is advised since there are limited numbers of places for some events and some types of accommodation.

----------------

BYRON: the poetry of politics and the politics of poetry
This conference will examine Byron’s engagement with politics in the widest sense: as a poet, as a member of the House of Lords, as a commentator on his time, and latterly as a would-be revolutionary.

The conference will be held at King’s College London’s Strand Campus in the heart of London. Accommodation will be available in King’s College London’s Stamford Street Apartments (a limited number of single en-suite rooms 10 minutes’ walk from the conference venue, at a cost of £41.25 per person per night - early booking is advised) and at the Strand Palace Hotel (five minutes' walk from the venue - bookings to be made directly with the Hotel). Conference discount available when booking for the conference, see booking page
A limited number of student bursaries will be available for those presenting a paper.

Highlights of the Conference Programme include:
•  a special exhibition ‘Byron and politics’: manuscripts, printed books and memorabilia from the John Murray Archive and the Foyle Special Collections Library, King’s College London, curated by David McClay (National Library of Scotland), Stephanie Breen and Katie Sambrook (King’s College London)
• ‘Byron, Elgin and the Marbles’: readings and reception hosted by the British Museum (including a private viewing of the Parthenon Sculptures)
• Byron, The Two Foscari: a dramatised reading, with excerpts from Verdi’s opera, I Due Foscari, performed by students of the Guildhall School of Music and Drama
• Debate on the motion: ‘that Lord Byron has had no meaningful impact on European history or politics’ (proposed by Peter Cochran, opposed by Jack Gumpert Wasserman)
• Orthodox Vespers in King’s College London Chapel, sung by members of the renowned King’s College London Choir
 • Reception and dinner in the Peers’ Dining Room at the House of Lords, with an optional guided tour of the Palace of Westminster
 Excursion to Harrow School (optional)


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