Wednesday, October 1, 2014


British Women Writers 2015 Conference

The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, June 25th -27th, 2015. The conference theme is “Relations” in British women's writing of the long 18th- to 19th-centuries. The submission deadline is January 5th, 2015. The CFP can be accessed at https://britishwomenwriters2015.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

Friday, May 16, 2014


NCSA 2015 Article Prize
The Nineteenth Century Studies Association (NCSA) is pleased to announce the 2015 Article Prize, which recognizes excellence in scholarly studies from any discipline focusing on any aspect of the long 19th century (French Revolution to World War I). The winner will receive a cash award of $500 to be presented at the Thirty-sixth Annual NCSA Conference, “Material Cultures/Material Worlds” in Boston, MA (March 26-28, 2015).
Articles published between September 1, 2013 and August 31, 2014 are eligible for consideration for the 2015 prize and may be submitted by the author or the publisher of a journal, anthology, or volume containing independent essays. The submission of essays that take an interdisciplinary approach is especially encouraged. The winning article will be selected by a committee of nineteenth-century scholars representing diverse disciplines. Applicants are encouraged to attend the conference at which the prize will be awarded.
Send one PDF file electronically of published articles/essays, including the publication’s name/volume/date etc. to the chair of the committee at the following email address: jmhill@unr.edu. All submissions via email will be acknowledged; queries should be addresses to Professor Jen Hill at the same email address. Applicants must verify date of actual publication for eligibility, and one entry per scholar or publisher is allowed annually. Essays written in part or entirely in a language other than English must be accompanied by English translations. Deadline for submission is September 30, 2014. 

The NCSA 2015 Emerging Scholars Award
The Nineteenth Century Studies Association (NCSA) is pleased to announce the 2015 Emerging Scholars Award. The work of emerging scholars represents the promise and long-term future of interdisciplinary scholarship in 19th-century studies. In recognition of the excellent publications of this constituency of emerging scholars, this award will be given to an outstanding article or essay published within five years of the author's doctorate. Entries can be from any discipline focusing on any aspect of the long 19th century (the French Revolution to World War I); they must be published in English or be accompanied by an English translation, and must be by a single author. Submission of essays that are interdisciplinary is especially encouraged.

Entrants must be within five years of having received a doctorate or other terminal professional degree, and must have less than seven years of experience either in an academic career, or as a post-terminal-degree independent scholar or practicing professional.

Only articles physically published between September 1, 2013 and August 31, 2014 (even if the citation date of the journal is different) are eligible for the 2015 Emerging Scholar Award. Articles published in any scholarly journal, including on-line journals, or in edited volumes of essays are eligible and may be submitted either by the author or the publisher of a journal, anthology, or volume containing independent essays. In any given year, an applicant may submit more than one article for this award.

The winning article will be selected by a committee of nineteenth-century scholars representing diverse disciplines. Articles submitted to the NCSA Article Prize competition are ineligible for the Emerging Scholars Award.

The winner will receive $500 to be presented at the annual NCSA Conference in Boston, MA March 26-28, 2015. Prize recipients need not be members of the NCSA but are encouraged to attend the conference to receive the award.

Deadline for submission is September 30, 2014.

Send electronic PDF submissions to: pcroce@stetson.edu, Chair of the Emerging Scholars Award, Professor Paul Croce, Department of History, Stetson University.  If necessary, three off-prints or photocopies of published articles/essays may be mailed to the committee chair. Please note that applicants must verify date of actual publication for eligibility and provide an email address so that receipt of their submissions may be acknowledged.

Call for Papers
36th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association
March 26-28, 2015 – Boston, MA

Material Cultures/Material Worlds
"What would happen to our thinking about politics if we took more seriously the idea that technological and natural materialities were
themselves actors alongside and within us - were vitalities, trajectories, and powers irreducible to the meanings, intentions, or
symbolic values humans invest in them?" -- Jane Bennett
We seek papers and panels that investigate elements of the material world belonging to the long nineteenthcentury. Topics may include collecting, possession(s), things and thing theories, realism, hoarding, bric-a­brac, souvenirs, historic houses (interiors and rooms), buildings and “truth to materials,” collecting folkloreand songs, Atlantic trade, colonial objects, commodity fetishism, animals as things (taxidermy, zoos, taxonomies), people as things (slavery, human zoos, relics, death masks), cabinets of curiosity, closets,antiquities, museum displays, theatrical stages and sets, textures, books and manuscripts as objects, themateriality of texts, art materials, food, fraudulent items or the luxury trade. We invite alternate interpretations of the theme as well.
Please email 250-word abstracts for 20-minute papers along with one-page CVs to the program chairs by September 30, 2014 to ncsaboston2015@gmail.com. Paper abstracts should include author's name, institutional affiliation, and paper title in the heading. We welcome panel proposals with three panelists and amoderator or alternative formats with pre-circulated papers and discussion.
Please note that submission of a proposal constitutes a commitment to attend the conference if the proposal isaccepted. All proposals received will be acknowledged, and presenters will be notified in November 2014.Graduate students whose proposals are accepted may, at that point, submit complete papers in competitionfor a travel grant to help cover transportation and lodging expenses. Scholars who live outside the NorthAmerican continent, whose proposals have been accepted, may submit a full paper to be considered for theInternational Scholar Travel Grant (see NCSA website for additional requirements http://www.ncsaweb.net). 



Tuesday, April 1, 2014

The ‘Exotic’ Body in 19th-century British Drama

The ‘Exotic’ Body in 19th-century British Drama

University of Oxford
Funded under the 2011 Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowships scheme, European Commission

25-26 September 2014
Faculty of English Language and Literature, University of Oxford


Convenor: Dr Tiziana Morosetti (Oxford)

Confirmed speakers:
Professor Ross Forman (Warwick), Dr Peter Yeandle (Manchester),
Dr Hazel Waters (Institute of Race Relations, London)


Increasing attention has been paid in recent years to the representation of the Other on the 19th-century British stage, with key studies such as Acts of Supremacy: The British Empire and the Stage, 1790-1930 (Bratton et al. 1991), The Orient on the Victorian Stage (Ziter 2003), Bodies in Dissent: Spectacular Performances of Race and Freedom, 1850-1910 (Brooks 2006), Racism on the Victorian Stage: Representation of Slavery and the Black Character (Waters 2007), Nineteenth-Century Theatre and the Imperial Encounter (Gould 2011), China and the Victorian Imagination: Empires Entwined (Forman 2013). Building on these, the conference aims at exploring the concept, politics, and aesthetic features of the ‘exotic’ body on stage, be it the actual body of the actor/actress as s/he performs in genres such as the ‘Oriental’ extravaganza, or the fictional, ‘picturesque’ bodies they bring on stage. A term that in itself needs interrogation, the ‘exotic’ will therefore be discussed addressing the visual features that characterize the construction and representation of the Other in 19th-century British drama, as well as the material conditions, and techniques that accompany the ‘exotic’ on stage on the cultural and political background of imperial Britain.

One of the dissemination activities for the two-year project ‘The Representation of the “Exotic” Body in 19th-century English Drama’ (REBED), funded under the 2011 Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowships scheme, the conference also hopes to function as a site for discussing the state of the art on the ‘exotic’ in the theatrical cultures of both Romantic and Victorian Britain; contributions on ongoing research and/or recently completed projects are therefore particularly encouraged.
Although attention will be paid mostly to the non-European Other, papers addressing a European ‘exotic’ are also welcome.

Topics include the following:

Definitions of ‘exotic’:
-Is the non-European Other on stage really ‘exotic’?
-Are any genres more ‘exotic’ (or more liable to convey ‘exotic’ stereotypes) than others?
-Do different dramatis personæ and/or settings convey different degrees of ‘otherness’?
-Can the British on stage be ‘exotic’, and, if so, to what extent?
-Is the spectacular on stage itself ‘exotic’?

Staging the ‘exotic’ body:
-How are costumes, make-up, scenery, movements employed to construct the ‘exotic’?
-Are any visual features more recurrent than others?
-To what extent is the visual representation of the ‘exotic’ body historically accurate?
-How does music contribute to the staging of the Other?
-Who embodies the ‘exotic’? Is the acting career informed by bringing the Other on stage?
-Who were the audiences? Did their composition have an impact on the performance of the ‘exotic’?
-Are any experiences abroad relevant to how managers staged the Other in Britain?
-In what ways were representations of the ‘exotic’ body informed by venues?
-The Other on the London stage and the provinces

Cultural and political backgrounds:
-To what extent did audiences’ expectations affect theatrical representations of the Other?
-In what ways do class, gender, race inform the acting and managing of ‘exotic’ pieces?
-To what extent did scientific and anthropological accounts inform theatrical portraits of the Other?
-Were illustrations of (European and/or) non-European countries informed by theatre?
-In what ways have political narratives influenced (or been influenced by) the ‘exotic’ on stage?
-Has the legal frame for the theatre influenced the staging of the Other?
-Visual points of contact between popular entertainment and theatrical representations of the Other

The travelling ‘exotic’:
-How do texts such as Arabian Nights, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, or Mazeppa ‘travel’ between dramatic and non-dramatic genres?
-Survival of a Romantic ‘exotic’ in the Victorian staging of the Other;
-Is Othello on the Romantic and Victorian stage ‘exotic’?
-How do translations/adaptations from other languages contribute to the construction of the Other on the British stage? Can we define a British specificity when it comes to the ‘exotic’?
-Has the theatrical representation of the ‘exotic’ in Britain had an impact on non-British stages?

The legacy of 19th-century ‘exotic’ body:
-Contemporary plays/performances addressing the Other on the 19th-century British stage (e.g. Lolita Chakrabarti’s Red Velvet)
-The ‘exotic’ body on the British stage in a diachronic perspective
-The non-European Other in the 20th- and 21st-century Christmas pantomime


Abstracts of no more than 300 words and a short bio should be sent to rebedconference@gmail.com by 25 May 2014. Speakers whose abstracts have been accepted will be notified by 15 June.






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